Eco International
Dispatches on global ecological issues, activism and consciousness from our international correspondents and guest writers.
Israel's Disappointing Brand of Environmentalism
Monday, 21 July 2014 00:00  |  Written by Shira Siegel | Blog Entry

Israeli Desert photo by Fred NienaberFor a young country that has transformed itself, despite scant resources, from proverbial no-man’s-land to thriving slice of the Middle East in 60-odd years, Israel and its people place environmental concerns and recycling surprisingly close to the bottom of their priority lists. Israel is a politically fragile state; people are more concerned about security, religious politics and whether or not they’ll be blown to pieces in a suicide bombing or rocket attack than about lobbying their municipalities for recycling collection or composting. Read on…

 
Masdar City: Beacon in the Desert, Glimpse into the Future
Monday, 07 July 2014 00:00  |  Written by Guest Contributor | Blog Entry

Solar Panel photo by Oregon DOTEven though the fallout from Japan's Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station disaster has almost completely disappeared from the headlines, catastrophe-proof renewable energy continues to be thrust into the spotlight as a safe, long-term energy alternative. And, as if on cue, on the edge of the Arabian Desert, an experiment is unfolding with a grand vision for a clean-energy future: It’s called Masdar City and it seeks to be the most sustainable city in world history. Read on...

 
No Car Required: The World’s Top Public Transit, Pedestrian and Bike-Friendly Cities
Monday, 19 May 2014 00:00  |  Written by Evan Miller | Blog Entry

Biking Culture in Copenhagen, Denmark photo by Spacing MagazineWith global warming a growing concern, anything that spews CO2—a major cause of climate change—is a no-no. Cars are responsible for about 35% of all CO2 emissions, so it’s fortunate that some forward-thinking cities have used urban planning to provide attractive alternatives to the automobile—primarily transport by foot, bike, bus and train. Not only are these better for the environment, but they make us healthier, save time and increase our bank accounts. Read on…

 
A Sweet Alternative: In Brazil, Cars Run on Ethanol from Sugarcane
Friday, 16 May 2014 00:00  |  Written by Victoria Cho | Blog Entry

Brazilian Sugarcane Farmer and Crop photo by Trees For The FutureBrazil has become the first country to incorporate sustainable fuel on a national scale and as a result is nearly energy self-sufficient. By capitalizing on its indigenous cane sugar crop, it has minimized carbon emissions and alleviated its dependence on oil. Currently, the country mandates that all fuel blends incorporate at least 20% of the sugar-derived ingredient. These strict regulations maintain Brazil’s leadership in the biofuel movement and draw admiration and envy from other countries, including the oil-addicted USA. Read on…

 
France's Waterwheel: Industrial Boon or Environmental Disaster?
Tuesday, 06 May 2014 00:00  |  Written by André Oosterman | Blog Entry

Water Wheel in Bayeux, France photo by Jason GriscomIn modern history, most countries have lost the vast majority of their forests. Japan is a well-known exception. In the 17th century, the Tokugawa regime outlawed logging on penalty of death. The ban was successfully implemented, partly because Tokugawa controlled an island nation effectively isolated from the rest of the world. Nowadays, almost 70% of Japan is covered by forests. A much less-known exception is France. Read on…

 
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Eco Tip

Take a “stay-cation” or vacation closer to home. Reduce your carbon footprint by staying home for vacation. If you do travel, stay as close to home as possible and use public transportation to reach your destination.  >More tips...

Eco Quote

Humankind has not woven the web of life.  We are but one thread within it.  Whatever we do to the web, we do to ourselves.  All things are bound together.  All things connect.  - Chief Seattle, leader of the Suquamish and Duwamish Native American tribes, 1855   More quotes...